Home

I’ll have more to say about this in the future. My simple answer is, there’s more than enough art out there that to be obsessively focused on so-called greatness becomes inexcusable.  But for now:

After filmmakers, actors, or musicians are accused of sexual assault or other misdeeds, how should we think about their work? NPR’s Ari Shapiro talks with author Claire Dederer, who considers the question in an essay for The Paris Review: “What Do We Do with the Art of Monstrous Men?”

https://www.npr.org/2017/11/24/566387340/how-people-are-grappling-with-art-from-monstrous-men

They did or said something awful, and made something great. The awful thing disrupts the great work; we can’t watch or listen to or read the great work without remembering the awful thing. Flooded with knowledge of the maker’s monstrousness, we turn away, overcome by disgust. Or … we don’t. We continue watching, separating or trying to separate the artist from the art. Either way: disruption. They are monster geniuses, and I don’t know what to do about them.

https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/11/20/art-monstrous-men/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s